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Archive for January 2010

Gökçen Dilek Acay

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Following one of the most cliché definitions of the art as a self expression method, I am trying to open each area of my life to it. Everything that I perceive combines with the imagination and becomes a reflection of the human being. Even though that I have attempted to do this in different ways, academic music has been dominant. But unfortunately, in some certain cases music can not be sufficient to express myself. Everything related to the human being, exists in the handwork; in the objects, cities, buildings, societies. I am also a part of this circle. To understand it better, in someway I am trying to reflect everything that I see, hear, taste and feel. Till now, apart from music, photography guided me. I searched in my mind and humour when I took photos. I have experimented to show people and cities from this point of view. But the variety of the expression types is still there and I want to take this diversity into my life.

I am looking for an interdisciplinary approach. Until this time I tried to learn more about semiology. I also wanted to reflect this diversity, the experience that was collected and created by my perceptions.

Contact Information
Gökçen Dilek Acay
Born in Istanbul 19.11.1983
gokcendilek@gmail.com
myspace.com/gokcendilek



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January 22, 2010 at 8:54 am

Josue Pellot

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statement:

My work is based on personal experience, convictions, education, and personal taste. My current primary focus is on concepts of identity (in general), the idea of a sponsored identity, consumerism as a creator of identity, and post-colonialism. This subject matter can be very specific and personal at times.

An important aspect the work is its relationship to the audience. While I do exhibit in traditional spaces such as galleries, more often than not I create pieces for community spaces. In this way the work breaches the correlation between art and consumerism and becomes something to talk about rather than remaining simply a “precious art” object.

The end product of most of my work has aesthetic elements that visually engage, inform, educate, or create interest for a viewer on the given subject.

bio:

Pellot was born in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, and resides in Chicago. He received his BFA from the University of Illinois, at Chicago, and his MFA from Northwestern University, Evanston Illinois. Pellot works in various mediums such as painting, screen-printing, video and sculpture. He is a conceptual artist who engages social critique, politics and humor.

Contact Information
info@josuepellot.com
http://www.josuepellot.com/
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January 22, 2010 at 8:48 am

Polly Perez

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Bodhisattva #2
Paper, tape, thread, gouache, ink, fabric, 2008

Navajo Rug (a little sex, a little violence)
Paper, tape, thread, postcards, fabric
2008

Polly Perez
Currently living and working in El Paso, TX

Print media and packaging from various cultures and eras, political propaganda, historical and scientific drawings, pop art, industrial design, and recycling are my influences. Examining consumption of the visual as a unique commodity is my curiosity. I approach it like a scientific process, with results depending on chains of small experiments.

I favor the use of recycled and found objects, especially old slides, books, advertising, and used fabrics in my current work. The shortened life cycle of goods in the global marketplace begs intervention – after being sold, bought, and used – things can become something different in their afterlife. With a sewing machine, tape, and intuition I test how feasible it is to intervene.

I feel like I straddle an invisible fence between cultures and histories; soaking in what I see in the world at large, mainly through print media, hybridizing it to my specs, and then turning it loose upon itself. It is either adulteration or making with what is at hand when there is lots at hand. Seeing things being thrown away as a byproduct of the current mass digital conversion of libraries, print media, and photographs is the perfect way to have lots at hand.

Education
2003 University of Texas at Dallas (B.A. in Art & Performance)

Contact Information
veggiecat@juno.com

Brave but Doomed
Paper, tape, thread, gouache, photographic slides
2008

Mount Everest
Paper, tape, thread, gouache, photographic slides
2008

Perlas y Almendras
Paper, tape, thread, gouache, photographic slides
2008

 

 

 

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January 21, 2010 at 11:10 am

Lauren Feece

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Artist Statement:

Lauren Feece is motivated by the challenge of being present in the moment. The paintings and drawings she creates are thoughts about the nature of things, musings on the everyday, and studies of the layers of meaning just under the surface. Losing track of the everyday details, life becomes a photo album of decorated daydreams.

Inspired by the connection of the artistic process to ritual, myth, and meditation she layers: brushstroke, line, swirls, drips, explosions and movements of paint, birds, clouds, color, flowers, trees, light, lace, pattern, blooms, webs, waves, vines, twilight, leaves, and sunsets into ornate visions of passing memories.

Lauren has been exhibiting her work since 1998. In 2002 she moved to Chicago to pursue a full time career as an artist. After years of rigorously exhibiting her work, she felt the need to return to a simpler life, more connected to the relaxed flow of the natural world. She and her equally creative partner relocated to a run down farm in Puerto Rico. In this beautiful environment, inspired by the natural world, she continues to explore life through her drawings and paintings.

To see more of Lauren’s work click here: http://laurenfeece.com/

 

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January 21, 2010 at 11:03 am

Ben Dallas

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Ben Dallas

Significant art surprises and confounds us by escaping conventionalized appearances or identities devised to accomplish some specified purpose; this includes the conventions of art itself. As a result, its quality is directly dependent on its ability to evoke some degree of vagueness and incompleteness that forces us to feel and contemplate the unfamiliar. This experience usually reveals more than it reinforces. Because they do this, good art works are like visions even when they have no aspirations to revelation or prophecy. A vision’s look is unexpected and holds your attention for as long as it remains a vision. To stay alive it must be stronger and more demanding than the satisfaction and assurance felt from believing you understand it or from knowing what it is; this we determine later after the experience. Attributing its appearance to metaphor or symbol or finding the patterns within yourself that remind you of something like it will break the vision’s spell, so it works to deny our ability to do this while it’s in our presence. Without equals, it resists resolution and clarity, as it doesn’t seem to belong to the world as it is. Instead, it partially brings the past to a close and redirects what will be by adding itself to our experience. I work to make objects that function as visions.

To see more of Ben’s work click here: http://www.bendallas.com

 

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January 21, 2010 at 10:58 am

Alberto Aguilar

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As a teenager I would look at past pictures of my childhood and family and start to cry. While in art school I was fascinated in work created by artists in their old age or near death. As a young adult I have moved away from working in isolation within a studio setting and using a specialized medium.

My work is autobiographical with a universal end. We all live, we are all moved, we all die. Through it I capture moments of inspiration that occur at any given time, under any given circumstances. I strive to retain a sense of youthfulness and play in my work, in an effort to slow down my own fleeing youth.

There is an amateur quality that may pervade the work I create using technology that I prefer to view as a human touch. I use digital media to document and record ideas, discoveries and acts in the making, realizing and passing. My work is highly intuitive and although I use chance as a guiding force I believe that it is purposely guided. I put together elements with no apparent relationship and then create meaning through their proximity. It is made directly and clearly without hesitation or questioning its validity as my work.

Through my collaboration with others the art making process becomes a communal endeavor and in turn makes it more meaningful for me. Rather than thinking of my family or students as obstacles for making art or spending time in the studio I incorporate them into my working process.
Although primarily working in sound, video and digital photography I welcome other mediums as well as research veins, which will take my work to new and unexpected terrains.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1) 68’Welch’Subway08’, 2008, 1:48
This piece is a recreation of two television commercials, one from 1968
and the other from 2008. I used my daughter for the main characters in
both recreations as well as the voice of my wife, a student and myself.
I chose the Welch’s commercial for its sentimental and psychological
edge while the Subway commercial was the only one that my daughter knew
by heart in watching Saturday morning cartoons.

2) Failing Memory or Intelligence, 2008, 5:44
In this piece I used excerpts from an article written in 1968 of what
life would be like in 2008. I juxtaposed these with interesting
lesser-known facts of 1968 and arranged them randomly in alternating
turn.

3) 12906088, 2008 2:38
In this piece I sang the words nineteen sixty eight to Otis Redding’s
Sitting at the Dock of the Bay because it was the only song of the top
ten of 68’ that I was able to match to tune. Afterwards I asked my
daughter, who is a drummer to fill in the gaps with the beat of her
choice using the words Two thousand and eight.

Check out Alberto Aguilar’s myspace page: http://myspace.com/albertoaguilarworks

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January 21, 2010 at 10:52 am

Noelle Mason

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In my trans-disciplinary practice I conceptually employ electronics, video, sculpture, installation, painting, photography, and craft to investigate the subtle seductiveness of power facilitated by systems of visual control. I am primarily interested in the artificial means by which we extend our ability to see and the mediating object’s affect on the transmission of images to affirm social and political hierarchies.

Mise-en-Scene appropriates the language of the gallery, video games, scientific experiment, and surveillance to examine how mediation functions both to facilitate acts of violence and to uphold the assertion of boundaries between cultural and political institutions of power. In Mise-en-Scene the viewer is presented with a sealed 8-foot room. Inside the room a woman stands in darkness, surveilled by four closed circuit night vision cameras that feed her real-time infrared image to corresponding monitors imbedded in each of the room’s outer walls. Under each monitor is a large red video game button. When a viewer presses one of the buttons an electric shock is administered to one of the performer’s limbs causing her muscles to seize from the jolt until the button is released. Mise-en-Scene explores the effect of a “social relationship mediated by images” as the desire to see is transformed into a means of painful control over another’s body. The seductive quality of surveillance synthesized with gallery mores and interface transparency makes viewer, institution, and artist equal participants in the creation of the scene.

In LAN Party or “National Take Your Daughter to Work Day” I graft autobiographical narrative onto appropriated images, objects, and contexts in an attempt to negotiate the complexities of power, which reverberate between the interpersonal and institutional. The resulting installation, or local area network (LAN,) implicates the viewer in an act of violence and uses the gallery as a medium to examine the historical precedence that affirms the authority of viewership. In LAN Party a Remington M700 police sniper rifle is poised atop a domestic looking table. A stool and headphone set invite the viewer to position herself behind the rifle, aimed at a small ornately framed monitor across the room. The monitor which, can only be seen and heard when standing in close proximity, shows found footage taken through the lens of an American helicopter sniper as he targets and kills Iraqis on the ground. The video is accompanied by a telephone recording of my father’s voice coolly describing the formal qualities of his own experience with the Remington M700 (weight, material, kickback.) Outfitted with headphones and enabled by the magnifying powers of the rifle’s scope, the viewer across the room receives the sniper footage in concert with the original soundtrack—the voices of gunmen and the booming sound of shots being fired.

Currently my work is informed by the unique socio-political climate of the Southern California border with Mexico and the imaging technologies used to uphold it. Ground Control is a wool Gobelin rug made in Guadalajara, Mexico by José Antonio Flores and Jonathan Samaniego in exchange for the amount of money it would cost a family of four to illegally immigrate to the United States. Ground Control reconstructs an image of the US/Mexico border at Mexicali/Calexico taken by the Terra satellite’s Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER.) ASTER is made possible by collateral exertions of energy, economy, research and labor between NASA, Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) and Japan’s Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC). Ground Control is an exercise in free monetary/commodity exchange across the U.S./Mexico border in contradistinction to the growing restrictions on human migration. The trans-national means of image collection and production of the work displaces the distinctions of national margins the ASTER photograph depicts, while the electromagnetic abstraction of the border obscures the image’s coded political content.

Check out more on Noelle Mason: http://www.noellemason.com

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January 21, 2010 at 10:45 am