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Patrick Holbrook

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Patrick Holbrook lives and works in Chicago. His work examines the spaces and movements of commodities and people, the intersections of power structures, ideological expression in engineered and cultural forms, cultural memory, and speculative possibilities of alternative ways of living. Based in video and digital media, but including other materials and objects, it has been shown at spaces such as The Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Antena in Chicago, and in solo exhibitions at Eyedrum and the Saltworks Gallery Project Room in Atlanta, A\V Space in Rochester NY, and Washington State University Tri-Cities. He is an Adjunct Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Columbia College, was a visiting artist at Rhode Island School of Design, Scripps College, and The University of Memphis, and was an Assistant Professor at the Georgia College & State University Art Department from 2002 to 2007, where he started the digital media area. He also curates exhibitions at Eel Space. He grew up in New Hampshire and received an M.F.A. from the University of Massachusetts – Amherst, a B.A. from Hampshire College, and plays music with The Wood Knots.

Patrick Holbrook
http://www.patrickholbrook.com/

A Record of Consumption
HDV, 2 Minutes and 23 seconds
2009

WATCH VIDEO HERE

Markers
HD DVD (2 minutes), 2008.

WATCH VIDEO HERE

Limb
HDV, 2 Minutes 40 Seconds, 2008.

WATCH VIDEO HERE

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January 22, 2010 at 9:55 am

Gökçen Dilek Acay

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Following one of the most cliché definitions of the art as a self expression method, I am trying to open each area of my life to it. Everything that I perceive combines with the imagination and becomes a reflection of the human being. Even though that I have attempted to do this in different ways, academic music has been dominant. But unfortunately, in some certain cases music can not be sufficient to express myself. Everything related to the human being, exists in the handwork; in the objects, cities, buildings, societies. I am also a part of this circle. To understand it better, in someway I am trying to reflect everything that I see, hear, taste and feel. Till now, apart from music, photography guided me. I searched in my mind and humour when I took photos. I have experimented to show people and cities from this point of view. But the variety of the expression types is still there and I want to take this diversity into my life.

I am looking for an interdisciplinary approach. Until this time I tried to learn more about semiology. I also wanted to reflect this diversity, the experience that was collected and created by my perceptions.

Contact Information
Gökçen Dilek Acay
Born in Istanbul 19.11.1983
gokcendilek@gmail.com
myspace.com/gokcendilek



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January 22, 2010 at 8:54 am

Alberto Aguilar

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As a teenager I would look at past pictures of my childhood and family and start to cry. While in art school I was fascinated in work created by artists in their old age or near death. As a young adult I have moved away from working in isolation within a studio setting and using a specialized medium.

My work is autobiographical with a universal end. We all live, we are all moved, we all die. Through it I capture moments of inspiration that occur at any given time, under any given circumstances. I strive to retain a sense of youthfulness and play in my work, in an effort to slow down my own fleeing youth.

There is an amateur quality that may pervade the work I create using technology that I prefer to view as a human touch. I use digital media to document and record ideas, discoveries and acts in the making, realizing and passing. My work is highly intuitive and although I use chance as a guiding force I believe that it is purposely guided. I put together elements with no apparent relationship and then create meaning through their proximity. It is made directly and clearly without hesitation or questioning its validity as my work.

Through my collaboration with others the art making process becomes a communal endeavor and in turn makes it more meaningful for me. Rather than thinking of my family or students as obstacles for making art or spending time in the studio I incorporate them into my working process.
Although primarily working in sound, video and digital photography I welcome other mediums as well as research veins, which will take my work to new and unexpected terrains.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1) 68’Welch’Subway08’, 2008, 1:48
This piece is a recreation of two television commercials, one from 1968
and the other from 2008. I used my daughter for the main characters in
both recreations as well as the voice of my wife, a student and myself.
I chose the Welch’s commercial for its sentimental and psychological
edge while the Subway commercial was the only one that my daughter knew
by heart in watching Saturday morning cartoons.

2) Failing Memory or Intelligence, 2008, 5:44
In this piece I used excerpts from an article written in 1968 of what
life would be like in 2008. I juxtaposed these with interesting
lesser-known facts of 1968 and arranged them randomly in alternating
turn.

3) 12906088, 2008 2:38
In this piece I sang the words nineteen sixty eight to Otis Redding’s
Sitting at the Dock of the Bay because it was the only song of the top
ten of 68’ that I was able to match to tune. Afterwards I asked my
daughter, who is a drummer to fill in the gaps with the beat of her
choice using the words Two thousand and eight.

Check out Alberto Aguilar’s myspace page: http://myspace.com/albertoaguilarworks

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January 21, 2010 at 10:52 am

Albert Stabler

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Art class understood as a nebulous ameliatory shadow-zone has a lot to do with fine art, and its recent historical trajectory. Collecting fine art remains a duty for a dwindling aristocracy, and a trophy hunt for the money-laundering nouveau-riche, but its larger purpose in the culture has come to be formed in an arena fenced in by the professional discourses of academia, the taste-crafting marketing elite, and the reputation economics of semi-public cultural cathedrals—where bits of art trickle down into the assessment machines and mission statements of nonprofits and educational institutions. These competing agendas have drowned out any clear extrinsic purpose for fine art, much like the cacophony of social engineers and population managers that have for so long made of education such a murky affair. Fine art has, in turn, acknowledged and responded to its crisis with a certain amount of vigor, changing from a specialized tradition with a stable patron base to a massive cultural space in which innumerable unseen performers partake of the shared magic of erudite transcendence.

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January 21, 2010 at 10:36 am

Lindsay Grace

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Lindsay Grace

About the Artist

Lindsay is a multitalented artist working in photography and electronic art.  He holds a Bachelor of Arts and a Master of Science from Northwestern University.  He is also a candidate for the Masters of Fine Arts in Electronic Visualization at the University of Illinois, Chicago.  He is a professor of Interactive Media at the Illinois institute of Art, Chicago.

From the Artist: Photography
My photography celebrates the continuity of play and work in multicultural island communities. Many of my photographs are taken in West Africa, South Asia, Central America, and the Caribbean using 35mm film or digital photography. All of the photographs are displayed as they were originally taken from the moment; no subjects are posed, no alterations are made after the shutter closes.

As a Cape Verdean American artist, I am distinctly familiar with the affect of island living, whether it is the physical microcosm of land between sea, or the micro-social distance between socio-economics.

From the Artist: Digital Media
My digital art seeks to highlight specific aspects of the social relationship between human and machine. These relationships are like most relationships, wonderful but full of distinct challenges that require attention.  I address these challenges by exploiting the scale and processes that makes computer applications so powerful.

My years of experience programming and designing software systems combines with my innate appreciation of language and the visual to fabricate hybrid experiences of the arts and sciences.

See more of Lindsay’s work here: http://www.lgrace.com/

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January 21, 2010 at 10:17 am