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Finishing School

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Finishing School

M.O.L.D.

M.O.L.D. is a hot zone-themed wet lab and workshop at Angels Gate in San Pedro (5/3-6/12) that investigates the science, politics, and culture of food decomposition. The audience is invited to participate in various experiments and build their own amateur bioindicators to assess food quality and safety. www.finishing-school.net/mold.html

Finishing School is an interdisciplinary artist collective that explores contemporary social, political, and environmental issues. Their projects conflate praxis, play, and activism and seek to engage audiences through various participatory models. Finishing School was established in 2001 and is based in Los Angeles.

Finishing School
www.finishing-school.net

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January 22, 2010 at 10:07 am

Patrick Holbrook

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Patrick Holbrook lives and works in Chicago. His work examines the spaces and movements of commodities and people, the intersections of power structures, ideological expression in engineered and cultural forms, cultural memory, and speculative possibilities of alternative ways of living. Based in video and digital media, but including other materials and objects, it has been shown at spaces such as The Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Antena in Chicago, and in solo exhibitions at Eyedrum and the Saltworks Gallery Project Room in Atlanta, A\V Space in Rochester NY, and Washington State University Tri-Cities. He is an Adjunct Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Columbia College, was a visiting artist at Rhode Island School of Design, Scripps College, and The University of Memphis, and was an Assistant Professor at the Georgia College & State University Art Department from 2002 to 2007, where he started the digital media area. He also curates exhibitions at Eel Space. He grew up in New Hampshire and received an M.F.A. from the University of Massachusetts – Amherst, a B.A. from Hampshire College, and plays music with The Wood Knots.

Patrick Holbrook
http://www.patrickholbrook.com/

A Record of Consumption
HDV, 2 Minutes and 23 seconds
2009

WATCH VIDEO HERE

Markers
HD DVD (2 minutes), 2008.

WATCH VIDEO HERE

Limb
HDV, 2 Minutes 40 Seconds, 2008.

WATCH VIDEO HERE

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January 22, 2010 at 9:55 am

Shane Mecklenburger

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Shane Mecklenburger

Artist statement

My work investigates post-industrial culture through the common uses and origins of modeling, gaming and information technologies. In my projects 3D models represent a quixotic attempt to make sense of things. To me games draw attention to the rules we (un)knowingly agree upon from one situation to another. I also use games and models for their association with childhood, which I see as an endless condition.

Lately I’ve become interested in shooter games and how they construct and conflate entertainment, childhood, war and masculinity. The video “Halcyon Atmosphere” and the sculpture it generated, “Semi-Automatic”, both use the sublime transformation of fearsome or horrific subjects into objects of contemplation and beauty, approximating of the kind of sublime experience of becoming immersed in a shooter game.

In shooter games, the gun quickly replaces the body as the primary site of agency, status and control. So in “Friendly Fire” we stripped a shooter game of all its other elements, including gravity. Only guns are left, floating in an infinitely empty expanse. “Friendly Fire” explores basic questions of personal agency within a set of rules and a field of “play” that appear to be familiar, but are in fact all inverted. The more the player shoots, the more guns appear and the less control the player has.

This sort of inversion is similarly illustrated in “on_The Ball”. A cue ball, which, like the shooter’s gun, is another presumptive “actor” or site of agency and control, has been fixed to the center of the video image. The table bounces around the ball, an inversion which calls attention to the limits of the playing field. The table becomes a metaphor for the unspoken rules we agree upon from game to game, from moment to moment. Who has more agency, the player or the agreed-upon boundaries of the game?

Contact Information
shane@shmeck.com
http://www.shmeck.com
Download CV


SEE THE VIDEO HERE SEE THE VIDEO HERE SEE THE VIDEO HERE

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January 22, 2010 at 9:46 am

Yong Choi

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Yong Choi

“The Statue of Yong” is a self portrait bronze sculpture by artist Yong Choi. The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago let him display his sculpture throughout the museum. Yong Choi received a BFA from the School of the Art Institue.

Art statement

My art is the best method to communicate with others. I want to share my feelings with other people because I can get inspiration from my ordinary life and others are in my story without their will and opinion. So I want to give a little present to them in return. When I carted my statue on the street, many people asked me to take picture of me with my bronze twin, and I was glad to pose with their children and answer their questions. I tried to do my best. Some of them got my information, and sent emails including the photo images with cheers. I love the mutual activities. I would not expect spectators see my work raise their heads. That is why I made him laying down on the ground, and people can come and see him easily.

At 4’ x 5’11” and 400 lbs my bronze piece is not light. The traditional medium, bronze, makes me jump into history. I recorded my idea and thinking of every single day. And bronze “YONG” can travel the world and survive after a couple of thousand years conveying my will. Nobody knows the future. That is why life is so hopeful and I overcome my difficulties in the moment. The affirmative concept of my life often helped me to grow into a better man, and overcome my anger and frustration. If I change my point of view, my keen cutthroat competition can be comic film to others. So I do not want to be too serious and will take a cheerful view of life.

Contact Information
cbj181818@gmail.com

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January 22, 2010 at 9:31 am

Georgina Valverde

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ARTIST STATEMENT:

My goal is to make simple and effective modifications to everyday objects in order to open up their meanings triggering new associations for the viewer. For me, the best art engages and stimulates perception. I hope to exploit an object’s communicative potential and lead the viewer to consider the source and function of the object within the material culture and the contradictions and complexity of such culture. I work with a variety of media including craft, video, ready-mades, and found objects.

I spent my childhood and adolescence in Mexico City absorbing a visual landscape spanning pre-Columbian, Colonial, and Modern times. My sensibility is informed by these early experiences and most powerfully by the ingenuity of folk culture and its capacity to assimilate and corrupt/transform all these languages into hybrid forms of expression. After moving to the United States I drew from my aesthetic reservoir in an attempt to cope with the loss of the visual stimuli of my youth. I favored the low-tech processes of silk-screening and block printing which allowed for more immediate self-expression and often used folk motifs retrieved from memory.

In my current work I investigate the intersection of different cultural registers (e.g. the language of modernism and minimalism vis-à-vis feminine handicrafts, consumer society, design, and the everyday). I continue to use what is at hand and process materials through the grid, repetitions, pairings, and juxtapositions. I am interested in how something small and mundane can open up to larger meanings.

BIO:

Georgina Valverde is a Mexican artist, born in Mexico City, 1962 and lives and works in Chicago, Illinois. She received her MFA from the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2003.

Contact Information
http://www.georginavalverde.com/

Photo credits: Bill Bengtson


Making Certain It Goes On (For R. H.)
Cloth, cotton thread, dried lime, metal staples, plastic bread ties, steel and paint
29¼ in. x 3 in. x 7 in.
2009

Making Certain It Goes On (For R. H.)
DETAIL
2009

Unraveling
Acrylic yarn and plasticine
42 x 38 x 60 inches
2002

The Sparrow Shits Upside Down (For A. G.)
Acrylic and wool yarn, soil, polypropylene rope, bamboo and paint
2009

The Sparrow Shits Upside Down (For A. G.)
DETAIL
2009

Blue Extension
Nylon, acrylic, and synthetic hair
216 in. x 17 in. x 17 in.
2002

Planets & Pyramids
Acrylic yarn, paper and resin
Dimensions variable
ongoing since 2006

Spiral
The artist’s hair
Dimensions variable
ongoing since 2004

Daily Coffee
Coffee on 50 paper towels
55 in. x 62 in.
2004

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January 22, 2010 at 9:25 am

Kristen Neveu

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England, 2007, 24″X30″

ARTIST STATEMENT:

With influences including Gustav Klimt, Joseph Cornell, and Georgia O’Keefe, Kristen’s mixed media paintings and installations are constructed with paint, paper, fabric, and her own photography. Her style is often striking, dealing often with patterns found in nature and geographical maps. Fascinated with the aspect of time, her work explores the past and the future, and their relationship to the present.

BIO:

My work examines the passing of time. Fascinated with both natural and urban environments, I attempt to capture delicate details and cycles of transformation that often occur in overlooked, everyday moments. Buildings are torn down and replaced, flowers fade and bloom, and people come and go. In my art, I’m addressing the fleeting feelings of isolation and comfort that can result in these periods of change and stasis, and the sense of wonder that the world and its movements give me.

Combining multiple artistic mediums in the process of constructing my layered collages and paintings, I collect and experiment with photography, paint, watercolor pencils, and found materials.

After growing up in Iowa, and graduating from the University of Iowa, I lived in Chicago for 13 years. I moved to Los Angeles in 2007 with my husband Brett, a writer, and my daughter, Lia Pearl.

Contact Information
http://www.kristenneveu.com

Another Day, 2009, 24″X30″
Nest, 2008 – 60″X36″

Starry, 2008, 30″X24″

 

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January 22, 2010 at 8:58 am

Gökçen Dilek Acay

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Following one of the most cliché definitions of the art as a self expression method, I am trying to open each area of my life to it. Everything that I perceive combines with the imagination and becomes a reflection of the human being. Even though that I have attempted to do this in different ways, academic music has been dominant. But unfortunately, in some certain cases music can not be sufficient to express myself. Everything related to the human being, exists in the handwork; in the objects, cities, buildings, societies. I am also a part of this circle. To understand it better, in someway I am trying to reflect everything that I see, hear, taste and feel. Till now, apart from music, photography guided me. I searched in my mind and humour when I took photos. I have experimented to show people and cities from this point of view. But the variety of the expression types is still there and I want to take this diversity into my life.

I am looking for an interdisciplinary approach. Until this time I tried to learn more about semiology. I also wanted to reflect this diversity, the experience that was collected and created by my perceptions.

Contact Information
Gökçen Dilek Acay
Born in Istanbul 19.11.1983
gokcendilek@gmail.com
myspace.com/gokcendilek



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January 22, 2010 at 8:54 am